Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh

posted by Eggsurance May 18, 2015
Dr. Aimee Egg Freezing

Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh, is a native of the Bay Area. She is a graduate of UCLA School of Medicine. After completing her residency in Obstetrics & Gynecology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, she completed a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility at University of Michigan. She also completed a Masters in Public Health in Health Management and Policy at University of Michigan. Dr. Eyvazzadeh has presented her research at the national meetings of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Endocrine Society and American College of Ob/Gyn. Her research has been published in several journals including Fertility and Sterility, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Menopause.

In 2014, she launched “Egg Freezing Parties.” These parties offer women a chance to learn more about their fertility and ask their questions in a comfortable, safe environment with like-minded women.


Eggsurance Interviews Dr. Aimee

Q. How long have you been involved with egg freezing?

A. I have been involved in egg freezing for fertility preservation since 2005. I did some of the first cases during my fellowship at the University of Michigan – we took care of 43 patients over the course of three years. We also did the first pediatric case for a 17 year old. Up until that time, a pediatric cancer fertility preservation case had never been done. So it was one of the first for that program. Egg freezing is something that I am very passionate about.

Q. What types of patients are you seeing at your practice?

A. Typically we see women over the age of 36 who have been in prior long-term relationships that did not work out and find themselves still childless, but definitely wanting to become pregnant. Most are not ready to do it on their own, but they still want to have the chance to meet the intended father. Some are ready to do it on their own, but may not be ready to commit to a sperm donor.

The most important message that I want women to hear is that everyone is a candidate for egg freezing. A lot of women are told that “you are too old” or “you’re too fertile looking.” I have frozen eggs in women as old as 43 and more recently as young as 21. There is no perfect candidate – everyone has a story and the question I answer for each of my patients is “what is your fertile potential right now and is it worth it for you to consider egg freezing or not?” Some women have the potential to have eggs frozen and some women don’t.

There is no perfect candidate – everyone has a story and the question I answer for each of my patients is “what is your fertile potential right now and is it worth it for you to consider egg freezing or not?” Some women have the potential to have eggs frozen and some women don’t.

Q. What is the optimal age for egg freezing?

A. If you tell a 25 year old woman “by the time you are 27 your fertility rates will decline,” she will look at you like: Are you crazy? I don’t have a problem. Leave me alone. I don’t want kids. I find that by the time someone is 32 or 33 they are more open to the idea. I would say that as a society I think we should be able to reach more women in their early thirties. Ideally it would be great to reach them when they are done with grad school – but most women aren’t even thinking along those lines.

Realistically speaking I don’t think we will be doing a lot of egg freezing until once women are in their early thirties. I would say that a woman who is 32 or 33 and still not partnered is at a good age to freeze her eggs. But I still think it is worth it at 35, 36, 37 or any age.

Q. OHSS has been a topic on the Eggsurance Forum recently, what should a woman do if she thinks she has OHSS (ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome) post procedure?

A. The goal for every procedure that we do is to do it in the safest way possible and to do the least amount of harm for the greatest benefit. Even before you go through a cycle I think the important message is to talk to your doctor to see what he or she will do to prevent OHSS. At the end of the day, there are some types of patients in whom OHSS is not preventable, but there are certain things that we can do as physicians to protect our patients.

For example, one approach is to do a Lupron trigger. Lupron is a short acting medication in the system, unlike the hcG trigger which lasts in your system for 7-10 days. Since you are exposed to a medication that is shorter acting and won’t be stimulating your ovaries even after the egg retrieval, OHSS may be prevented. Also, knowing your FSH, AMH, ovarian volume, antral follicle count and being monitored very closely is one way to prevent OHSS. There are a number of different medications that have been used as well such as IV Hespan and IV Albumin treatments that can be given on the day of the egg retrieval that may prevent OHSS. Also, certain types of diets may help. For example, we recommend high protein diets prior to and after your retrieval and drinking such things as coconut water.

Q.  What is the one thing you would like to tell women about egg freezing?

A. Just trust me, do it! Your fertility is not skin deep. If you are considering it – do it.

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