When should you freeze?

WHEN SHOULD YOU FREEZE YOUR EGGS?

Today’s world is very different from our mothers’ – we are at a cultural and generational crossroads.
Women are returning to grad school in record numbers, climbing the corporate ladder, leaning in, paying off student loans…and struggling to find love in the brave new world of online swipes and clicks.  All of this takes time.
Unfortunately, our biological clocks have not reset to today’s reality.
Not matter how active and healthy you may be, your age and your fertility are directly correlated. The younger you freeze your eggs, the better your odds of a successful pregnancy later.
key-to-fertiliy

AGE DOES MATTER

age-impacts-fertility
source: Center For Disease Control
Unlike men who continue to produce sperm over their lifetime, women have a finite supply of eggs or ovarian reserve.
As you age, the quantity and quality of your healthy eggs declines, impacting your monthly chance of conception.
An inflection occurs around age 35, making it harder and harder to conceive naturally with each passing year. By age 40, a woman has a less than 5% chance of a successful pregnancy per cycle.
And, as eggs age so do the risks. The possibility of chromosomal abnormalities and associated conditions such as Down’s syndrome increases with age – rising from approximately 1 in 385 births at age 30 to 1 in 63 births at age 40.

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO FREEZE YOUR EGGS?

This is a really good question. If a woman freezes her eggs too early there is always the possibility that she may get pregnant without needing to use her frozen eggs. However, if we look at IVF data there is an inflection point in pregnancy rates after the age of 35. Between the ages of 38 to 39 there is an even larger inflection point. Certainly over age 42 there is not much benefit to freezing your eggs. Typically, 41 and under is the limit.  – Eggsurance interview with Dr. Jamie Grifo, NYU Fertility Center
Once you get past age 33, 34, even up to 35, there is still about a 50% baby rate from frozen eggs. However, once you get past 35 it follows the pattern in regular IVF: from ages 36, 37, 38 you should expect a 30-40% live birth rate, from ages 38, 39, 40 it is approximately a 25-30% live birth rate, and from age 40, 41, 42 the live birth rate significantly declines to about 15-20%. Above 43, the genetic abnormality rate is extremely high at 90-99%. Eggsurance interview with Dr. Daniel Shapiro, RBA

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